GENERATED GLOSSARY: Trust

The General Definition of Trust (also, a general model of trust):

  • “trust is that which is essential to a communication channel but cannot be transferred from a source to a destination using that channel”.


Derived definitions (i.e., applied models):

  • “trust about an entity’s behavior on matters of x is that which an observer has estimated at epoch T with a variance as small as desired”,
  • “trust  about an entity’s behavior on matters of x is that which an observer has estimated with high-reliance at epoch T”,
  • “trust is a set of natural and logical connections between expected and actual behavior”,
  • “trust is expected fulfillment of behavior”,
  • “trust is to expect all previously observed behavior”,
  • “trust is to expect absence of any previously unobserved behavior”,
  • “trust is an intersubjective statement that stands behind an authorization”,
  • “trust is an open-loop control process of an entity’s response on matters of x”,
  • “trust is to rely upon actions at a distance”,
  • “trust is to rely upon reactions at a distance”,
  • “trust is to rely upon actions or reactions at a different point in space or time”,
  • “trust is qualified reliance on information, based on factors independent of that information”,
  • “trust is reliance on received information, coherently with some extent”,
  • “trust is that which an observer can rely upon to some known extent regarding a subject matter”,
  • “trust is what an observer knows about an entity and can rely upon to a qualified extent”,
  • “trust is received information which has a degree of belief that is acceptable to an observer”,
  • “trust is knowledge acceptable by an observer”,
  • “trust is knowledge about one’s perception of a fact”,
  • “trust is that which provides meaning to information”,
  • “trust is a link between a local set of truth-values and a remote set of truth-conditions”,
  • “trust is a link between reference and referent”,
  • “trust is a link between referent and sense”,
  • “trust is a link between reference and sense”,
  • “trust is measurable by the coherence of understanding”,
  • “trust is that which absence can make any state possible”,
  • “trust is that which absence can make any state transition possible”,
  • “trust is that which absence can make a process non-ergodic”,
  • “trust is that which absence cannot justify reliance”,
  • “trust is time measured without a clock and/or space measured without  a scale”,
  • “trust is a link between conceptual and perceptual realities”,
  • (objective) “trust is a coherent collective agreement”,
  • (intersubjective) “trust is a bilateral agreement, not necessarily balanced”,
  • (subjective) “trust is what you know you know you know” — i.e., you know, you can recall at will and you know how to use,

Trust is not:

  • surveillance,
  • auditing,
  • reputation,
  • authorization,
  • closed-loop control,
  • insurability,
  • indemnifiability,
  • belief,
  • accountability,
  • hope,
  • intuition,
  • faith,
  • unqualified,
  • the inverse of risk,
  • the absence of risk,
  • transitive,
  • distributive (in psychological, sociological and legal sense),
  • associative (in mathematical sense;  also in psychological, sociological and legal sense),
  • symmetric.

Trust values: Trust has a minimum of three possible values: +, 0 and –

    • +       trusted according to policy(+), here called trust
    • 0       trust value not assigned by either policy(+) or policy(-), here called atrust and equivalent to the statement “needs zero trust”
    • –       trusted according to policy(-), here called distrust

The respective (+) and (-) policies define the extent of trust for each positive and negative range. The trust value depends on the extent of trust. The larger the extent, the more you trust (or distrust). However, within that extent trust (or distrust) is always 100%.

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